Archive for March, 2016

Easter Egg Decorating

Author: helga
10 years of Easter eggs

10 years of Easter eggs

Our family has been decorating eggs in various ways since the children were small.  My favourite memory is an Easter dinner where everyone decorated eggs after dinner.  The adults needed a little persuading, but everyone did participate.  No special materials are needed. Find  markers,  acrylic craft paints, white glue, coloured paper and whatever other inspiring materials might be around the house.

Painted with acrylic paints

Painted with acrylic paints

Collage with white glue and gift wrap or magazines

Collage with white glue and gift wrap or magazines

Collage with tissue paper and white glue

Collage with tissue paper and white glue

Tissue paper collage with dollar store bling

Tissue paper collage with dollar store bling

Coloured or patterned tissue paper works well with white glue. It creates a smoother surface than paper. It also covers the holes if you want to use decorated eggs as table decorations or in gift baskets.

Rose petals and white glue

Rose petals and white glue

Experiment with real  rose petals.

Dyed with Silk

Dyed with Silk

This year we tried dying eggs with old silk ties. When boiled with vinegar, silk will transfer its colour to the eggs.  The silk can be used from old ties, scarves or clothing scraps. It must be silk. Polyester or cotton will not work. We used empty shells which, unfortunately,  float instead of staying in the boiling water. Putting a small pot lid or plate on top to hold them under water solved the problem.

This technique produces a swirly, tied-dyed effect. To get a more direct transfer of the pattern wind the cloth very tightly with thread.

Eating Eggs for Easter

Author: helga

Since the first human watched an inert egg hatch into a moving, living bird, eggs have been a symbol of new life.   Decorating eggs for Easter is a tradition in many cultures and one that our family has always enjoyed.  We like to have blown out shells to decorate and that means eating a lot of eggs before Easter.  An extra egg or two can always be added to a pancake or waffle recipe to empty extra shells. But to have a plethora of egg shells,  cooking some egg dishes is required.

These will likely be an omelet, a frittata, quiche, or simply scrambled eggs. It needs to be a recipe where egg yolks and whites are cooked together, not separated, like in a soufflé.  Omelets come from the French tradition, frittata, a little thicker,  are Italian. Both are like an egg pancake cooked in a round pan. A quiche is more like a pie with a crust underneath the egg mixture.

Here is Julia Child, herself cooking an omelet. The process  seems a little complicated when I’m just in a hurry to make some eggs. However, the shaking involved is quite intriguing – I will try this later.  Epicurious has The Only Frittata Recipe You’ll Ever Need. A nice summary page that shows the various ingredients that can be added to a frittata for variety. Canadian Living has a very nice recipe for Quiche.  A little secret for a quick meal.  Almost any ingredient added to a frittata or omelet can be added to scrambled eggs when you’re in a hurry.  Stirred eggs don’t taste  significantly different from solidified eggs.

My egg recipe of choice turned out to be scrambled eggs, quick and simple stirred up with some butter and green onions.
Scrambled eggs

Now if you want to make scrambled eggs like a celebrity chef, here is Gordon Ramsey.

 

The eggs need to be blown out of the shells obviously, not cracked into a bowl like usual.     The smaller the hole, the nicer the egg will look but the harder it is to blow out.  One quick way is to stab each end with a small nail (like a picture hanging nail) and then blow out the egg.